DISCUS Engineered Products

Trust your inner roof

DISCUS Technical Bulletins

Archive for the “Uncategorized” Category

Sep 7

Written by:
Julie Anne Cormier

Posted in:
Internal Floating Tank Covers,
The Tank Industry,
Uncategorized

0 Comments

Why pull the plug on drains?

DISCUS IFR in Tank 337The design philosophy behind a significant shift in floating cover technology: decks without drains.

Cover drains are defined by the US EPA in AP-42 as either “open” or “closed”. Closed drains are not typically used on aluminum floating covers. Open cover drains can be either “flush” or “overflow”. Overflow drains are not typically used on aluminum floating covers either. We are left with open drains that are flush with the cover and extend to the liquid under the cover to allow liquid to drain off the floating cover. These are also called “stub drains” or “automatic drains”. Since they are open, this type of drain is a source of emissions. Read more from the Nov/Dec 2015 issue of Tank Storage Magazine

READ THE COMPLETE ARTICLE >

Nov 2

Written by:
Julie Anne Cormier

Posted in:
News and Announcements,
The Tank Industry,
Uncategorized

0 Comments

Watch for the latest DISCUS article

Website-Media-Ad2xFullpage-TSM-DISCUS-151102-500x321Stay tuned for our new published article coming out this week in the Nov/Dec 2015 issue Tank Storage Magazine, including our latest “Trust your inner roof” ad!

• New LAER benchmark, the EPA’s lowest achievable emissions rate
• Welded seams — zero loss
• Bolted seams — best ever tested
• No enclosed spaces — no trapped vapors
• Patent pending

Sep 14

Written by:
David Rosenkrantz and Julie Anne Cormier

Posted in:
Internal Floating Tank Covers,
Uncategorized

0 Comments

5 Potential causes of liquid on a cover, and what to do about it

F Topside at Seal and Funnel

The DISCUS cover does not have drains, and is built as a series of bulkheaded open compartments. We’ve had countless discussions on the various scenarios that can lead to liquid on the top of a cover, and what to do about it. In this post, we’ve highlighted some of the most common concerns. Continue reading

Page 1 of 11